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The 1903 Barcroft News


Below is a nearly complete set of the first Barcroft News, which began publication on June 7, 1903. It is a unique and charming glimpse of life in our neighborhood around the turn of the last century.

According to its masthead, the first Barcroft News was written, edited and published in 1903 by O. Edward Haring, the son of Oscar Haring, who ran a general store at Columbia Pike and Four Mile Run (where the Barcroft Shopping Center is a hundred years later) at that time. Eddie Haring was then 18 years old. He was "a very bright, likeable fellow and the hero of all the neighborhood belles and the ring leader in all the sports and social events as well," according to Louise Payne's recollection in her article on Barcroft.

More recently we have been told that the actual writer and printer of the paper was Sydney Marye, an uncle of Eddie Haring who also lived in the neighborhood with his family. Marye's daughter, Adaline Marye Robertson, lived in Barcroft until the late 1990's and although she was just a babe at the time she remembers that it was a family joke that Sydney insisted on crediting the paper to Haring. (Adaline was mentioned in the 1903 Barcroft News as "the baby at the Maryes"' and she is still being honorably mentioned in the present day Barcroft News!)

The four pages of the paper were only 4" wide by 5 3/4" long. The little newspaper served a community of 20 houses, and the masthead proclaims that it was published in "Barcroft, Va."

The "Personals" give an interesting peek at life in Barcroft 85 years ago. People did lots of visiting, gardening was popular, and the Barcroft Mill was still grinding meal. Other features covered local events, the condition of Columbia Pike, the running of the railroad up Four Mile Run, and County elections. There were ads for building lots, groceries and baled hay. There is a dig at Falls Church in the July 5 issue, and there was constant sniping at Southern Railway, who ran the trains Marye and other Barcrofters used to commute to work in DC. It was a great little paper, and the patronizing review in the big Washington Times called it "the smallest and most novel newspaper published in America."

The Haring/Marye Barcroft News was the third publication printed in Arlington County and the first neighborhood newsletter. It was published "fortnightly" for about six months, ending with the November 23, 1903, issue. Later when the Barcroft School and Civic League began publishing its newsletter it was natural to use the original 1903 name. So the roots of the Barcroft News go a long way back.

The front page of issue number 3, July 5, 1903, appeared as an illustration in an article titled "A History of Printing in Arlington (Alexandria) County" by Robert Nelson Anderson. The article was published in the Arlington Historical Magazine in October of 1959. The caption says "..said to be one of the earliest items to be printed in what is now Arlington County, Virginia." The author had probably never heard of Sydney Marye, and of course assumed that Haring had published the paper.

A close look at the 1903 Barcroft News shows that it was a quality publication despite its size. It was very well edited, the spelling was exceptionally accurate, the grammar was exemplary, the general tone was mature, the viewpoint was adult, the typesetting was flawless and the printing was quite professional. Would young blade-around-Barcroft Eddie Haring have had the skills to produce such a paper? Marye was an employee of the Government Printing Office, and seems more likely to have published the paper as a hobby, attributing it to Haring because of his job at GPO. That would explain two serious articles about union activities at GPO, and numerous articles about commuting to Washington on the train.

An Alexandria Daily Times review quoted in issue No. 3 spoke of the "youthful editor," but said "We seem to recognize the ear-marks of an old sinner in some of the articles, and congratulate Editor Haring either on his adaptability to imitate a good lead or in the selection of his assistant." From these indicators it seems likely that Mrs. Robertson's memory is correct, and Sydney Marye was actually responsible for the paper.

Thanks to Mrs. Robertson our BSCL archives have copies of the papers, and we have reproduced the text here. This set is missing only issues No. 2 and 5. You will occasionally find excerpts from the 1903 Barcroft News in issues of the present-day Barcroft News, which in 2004 carries the heading Volume 101 thanks to its origins in 1903. Its editor from 2005 to 2008 was Annie Harold, living in the same house where the Maryes lived, writing and editing the Barcroft News in the same rooms where Sydney Marye had written and edited the 1903 edition.



Here is what the Barcroft News really looked like.





Below is the text of the issues, without the charm of the original tiny size and print, but legible in Web format. Any errors you see are probably ours, made in transcribing, since the originals were meticulously typeset and edited.





The Barcroft News

Vol. I - Barcroft, Va., June 7, 1903. - No. 1.
Published Fortnightly by
O. EDW. HARING - - EDITOR


PERSONAL

Miss Nettie Palmer has returned from a two weeks' visit to friends and relatives in Baltimore. She has enjoyed her visit very much, but says that there is no place like home--if the home is in old Virginia.

Mr. Nathan Westcott visited Barcroft last Monday. He gives a glowing account of crop prospects around Vienna.

Mrs. Oscar Haring was the first in the neighborhood to rejoice in spring lamb and green peas.

Judge John Pelham, of Anniston, Ala., is spending a few days with his father at Miles Away.

Mrs. W. W.Chamberlain, of Beaumont, Texas, with her two daughters, is paying a visit to her brother, Mr. S. T. Marye.

Milton Payne has recovered from an attack of mumps and he can now use vinegar on his salad with impunity.

Master Paul Marye, dressed in his new spring pants, met his "Pops" at the depot last week.

Mrs. S. A. Marye is testing the virtues of the famous "Erup" waters near Glen Carlyn.

Mrs. Wilson, of Loudon County, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Col. Tom Burke.

Mrs. George Schick is expecting her daughter, Mrs. Klemroth, of Brunswick, Ga., to spend the summer with her.

Miss Edith Kolb's new tennis court will soon be ready for the "sweet girl-graduates."


NEWSLETS

The "White House," near the mill, is soon to be occupied by Mr. W. D. Johnston.

The Barcroft Mill, under the new management, is furnishing an abundance of the best "water-ground" meal.


WRIGHT MAN IN RIGHT PLACE

Mr. S. P. Wright is making many improvements in the property recently purchased by Mrs. Fox. He is building a beautiful cottage just east of the lake on Cedar Street [Columbia Pike--the name did not stick!] and has sold two lots adjoining Miles Away to Miss Johnston and another lot to Mr. Kolb.




We have only the first page of issue number one. There may or may not have been more pages.

Issue No. 2 is missing.





The Barcroft News


Volume I. - Barcroft, Va., July 5, 1903. - No. 3.




PERSONAL

Miss Kate Roberson is spending this week with Miss Edith Corbett at Bethesda, Md.

Misses Alice and Ethel Smith left last week to spend several weeks in Tarrytown- on-the-Hudson.

Mr. Ben Smith and Mr. C. E. Lightfoot are both quite ill with malaria.

Miss Lou Loeb, of Washington, is visiting Miss Kate Munson.

Mr. and Mrs. Bradbury have returned from a trip to Lexington, Va.

Judge John Pelham left last week for his home in Alabama.

Capt. Bales and his charming daughter, Miss Inez, were the guests of Miss Johnston at Miles Away last Sunday.

Mrs. Chamberlain is quite puffed up. This is due rather to poison oak, however, than to pride.

Mrs. B. R. Dewey and Stuart, her son, are the guests of Mrs. Schick.

Major and Mrs. John D. Russell, of Washington, are spending the day with the Maryes.

Capt. L. L. Bridges, of Hyattsville, Md., who has been "under the weather" for "quite a spell" is very much better.

Mrs. J. R. Sprigman and her daughter, Miss Mary, are visiting Mrs. Schick.

Mr. Barbour will preach at the chapel every Sunday at 3:30 p.m. until further notice.

Misses Mary and Emma Pelham, of George, nieces of Judge Pelham, are spending a part of the heated term at Miles Away.

Mr. Richard Wirt, of Alexandria, paid Barcroft a visit yesterday, and took some of our young ladies to town in the evening to see the fireworks.

Mr. and Mrs. Johnston and their daughters, Dorothy and Nan, have taken up their summer residence at the White House. Miss M. E. Girdner, of Thomasville, Ga., on her way to Boston, stopped over yesterday to call on Miss Mary Pelham.

Capt. Merrifield "pulled off" a typical New England village Fourth of July at Falls Church, a small town up the road, between Barcroft and Herndon. The captain is a "down Easter" who makes railroad trains, elections, festivals and all else with which he has to do Merry. Here's to the captain and to the flag that "sot us free" --from England.


There is some talk of the property owners hereabouts getting out an injunction restraining electric road surveyors. So many have been about these diggings lately that they are trampling the crops.



The Barcroft News

Published Fortnightly


O. EDW. HARING - - EDITOR
Terms.
One year.....$.50
Six months... .25
Per copy..... .03
Advertising rates on application.


July 5, 1903

ANNOUNCEMENTS

For Sheriff of Alexandria County

WILLIAM H. PALMER






CROWDED TRAINS

The crowded trains of our railroad, especially on Monday mornings, is certainly evidence of its poor management. Often there is not a vacant seat when the train reaches Barcroft on its way to town. The amount of patronage would seem to justify better treatment, and we have not doubt that if there were competition we would get it.

We have received the second copy of the Barcroft, Va., News. While small in size, it's full of spirit, and its youthful editor, Mr. O. Edw. Haring, has our best wishes for his success. We seem to recognize the ear-marks of an old sinner in some of the articles, and congratulate Editor Haring either on his adaptability to imitate a good lead or in the selection of his assistant. Long live Barcroft; long live the News. -- Alexandria Daily Times.




ODIOUS COMPARISON

A lady of Barcroft--you've met her--
Went North, where the people did pet her.
Now, whatever you do--
Whether boil, bake or brew--
She says: "Oh, up North they do better."


NEWSLETS

A certain Barcrofter is so filled with pride in the contemplation of his son and heir that, it is rumored, he has been obliged to have the seams of his coat let out a number of times.

During the recent electric storm the house of Miss Sarah Ball was struck in three places. Though no serious damage was done, the owner mourns the loss of several family relics. A rich specimen of gold-bearing rose-quartz was found a few days since in the garden of Miss Johnston. It has been known for some time that there are all indications here of petroleum. Our undeveloped resources will yet astonish the world.

Mr. Collins, of West Falls Church, is one of the "rising" young men of the State. He always yields his seat in a crowded car to a lady or an elderly person.


A PAT ON THE BACK

Brunswick, Ga.
June 25, 1903

Editor Barcroft News:

I have to thank you for the second number of your dear little cracker jack of a paper. It is very neatly gotten up and clearly typed--an acorn, as it were, destined to become an oak. Barcroft will blossom out into a village in the near future--as soon as the bridge across the Potomac is completed--and then the people of Washington will find out what a healthy place is within reach of the city, that there malaria and "sketers" are unknown and that the pure water from the Blue Ridge mountains is curative of any kidney or liver complaints. The electric cars will soon "skite" across the landscape and slap one down into the city in twenty minutes, or maybe the Southern railway will wake up and realize that the Bluemont division is as good paying a branch as any on their whole system and perhaps worth a better passenger service, and they will then not use it as a dumping ground for antiquated locomotives and stock in general. In your capacity as journalist you can do a whole heap of giving pointers.

I want to come back to Barcroft.

Yours truly,

E.H.KLEMROTH

We wish to heartily thank our esteemed fellow-citizen, and earnestly hope and believe that the acorn has been planted in fertile soil. As a place of suburban residence Barcroft and its immediate vicinity have many attractions, and they would be more generally taken advantage of but for the inconveniences of travel. We believe the policy of the Southern to be short-sighted--that the increased business resulting would within a very short time amply repay considerable outlay for betterment of service.



J. E. DYER & CO.

WHOLESALE

GROCERIES, LIQUORS

3330-32 M STREET

WASHINGTON, D.C.






A SOCIAL TIME

Mrs. Wm. Palmer gave a delightful musicale on the evening of the 25th ult. Misses Jessie Florence Springer, Melva Windeck and Cornelia Parker, Mesdames Hutchinson and Parker and Mr. Chester Hutchinson, all of Washington, treated the company to excellent vocal and instrumental music. The decorations were green and white, and the refreshments were salads, ice cream, cake, etc. Few can equal Mrs. Palmer as a hostess. Judge Charles Pelham, who has quite a reputation for telling fortunes, told the fortune of Miss Parker, but was denied the honor of telling Miss Springer's.


TOO CRITICAL

Editor Barcroft News:

Dear Sir -- The "Monitor" has seen fit to publish a number of articles reflecting on the architecture of the steeple of the Arlington Methodist Church. The congregation would have much preferred a handsomer steeple, but were necessarily governed by the contents of their pocketbooks. The garment was cut according to the cloth. It was large enough, at least, to attract the lightning. If others are dissatisfied, they have the privilege of contributing toward the erection of one more in keeping with the dignity and honor of the church. We consider this matter one that concerns only ourselves, and object to having misleading statements made.

Respectfully, A FRIEND.


DRAMATIC

"Grandmother's Family Album" was given at the Arlington Methodist Church on June 26, to the delight of a large and appreciative audience. Miss Rachel Lewis' rendition was one quite out of the ordinary. It was simply splendid. Miss Lewis is a native of Fairfax county and is a great credit to the Old Dominion. She will be heard from in the lecture field in the near future. The entertainment was for the benefit of the church, and even Miss Kate Roberson was satisfied with the amount realized. Much credit is due to Miss Minnie Keys for the success achieved in exhibiting the living pictures.


Paul Marye is the best single-handed eater in this county. (Judge John Pelham)

President Roosevelt passed through Barcroft two weeks ago to-day just too late to get his name in our last issue. He knows a good thing when he sees it, and we would not be surprised to hear of his buying a site here.







BUYING

LOTS IN BARCROFT IS NOW A

SPECULATION. NEXT SPRING

THEY WILL HAVE DOUBLED

IN VALUE. BUY ONE NOW.

S. P. WRIGHT

Barcroft - Virginia






DOWDEN & BRO.

Dealers In

MILL-FEED AND

BAILED HAY

Barcroft Mills

Barcroft, Virginia




E. A. SHREVE & CO. LABEL PRINTERS MAY Bldg......7th & E Sts.

WASHINGTON, D.C.








The Barcroft News


Vol. 1. - Barcroft, Va., July 19, 1903. - No. 4.





PERSONAL

We are pleased to learn that Mrs. S. P. Wright has so far recovered from her recent indisposition as to be about again.

Dr. Nora Moyer and her mother, Mrs. Myoer, both of Washington, spent Sunday last with Mrs. Oscar Haring. This was Dr. Moyer's first visit to these parts, and she was so pleased as to gladly accept an invitation to call again.

Master Paul Marye held a reception at his home on the morning of the 10th. Among his most enthusiastic admirers were Mrs. Maedel and Mrs. Kolb.

Mr. Roy Pritchard, of Baltimore is spending a few days at the residence of Mr. Wm. Palmer.

The contract has been let to Mr. Frank Hale for the building of a Presbyterian church near Whitehead's blacksmith shop, down the road apiece.

Mrs. Mary A. Payne and her son, Milton, spent a few days at Hyattsville last week, visiting Mr. Elias Rowell, a relative. Mr. Frank Payne, Jr., has begun the erection of a dairy and a barn on his place near Barcroft.

Mrs. Irene Dayton and son, of Washington, were among last Sunday's visitors to Mrs. W. Palmer.


VILLAGE FAIR

The village fair on the lawn of the Presbyterian Church last week was a highly successful affair both financially and socially. Everybody was there, and the girls looked their very best. The grounds were ablaze with lanterns and the booths were well patronized. The Barcroft delegation was chaperoned by Mrs. Haring, Miss Johnston, and Mrs. Kolb. The first prize, a gold watch, was awarded to Miss Gertrude Young, and the second, a ring, to Miss Elsie Jordan. Miss Ruth Young received honorable mention. Mr. Clements made the presentation speeches.


GOOD JUDGMENT

The home of the President's mascot is to be on Holmes' Run, Fairfax county, not far from here. Parties who are said to be acting for the President have purchased about 1,000 acres of improved and unimproved land on the banks of this stream. The tract includes a magnificent building spot on Munson's hill, about half way between Barcroft and Annandale, which commands an extensive view to the east and south, including Washington and a considerable stretch of the Potomac.


The Barcroft News

Published Fortnightly
O. EDW. HARING - - EDITOR

Terms
One year.....$.50
Six months... .25
Per copy...... .01
Advertising rates on application.


July 12, 1903

ANNOUNCEMENTS

For Sheriff of Alexandria County

WILLIAM H. PALMER


For Commonwealth's Attorney
of Alexandria County

R. C. L. Moncure.






BEARING FRUIT

We are pleased in being able to announce that our criticisms of the management of the Southern railroad have borne fruit to the extent of meeting the general approval of our readers. There is a movement on foot which, insignificant though it may now appear, may pave the way to the accomplishment of the end we all so earnestly desire--better facilities of travel. This movement has in view the "getting together" of as many of the road's suffering patrons as have the manhood (and womanhood, too) to express their opinion and to sign a round-robin to the management of the road that will inform them in unmistakable terms "where we are at" in this matter. We wish to repeat a sentiment expressed in our last issue: that the policy of the road is one of short-sightedness. Were the facilities anywhere within the bounds of reason, this part of Virginia would rapidly build up, and the amount of travel would treble within two years.


JINGO VERSE

A lady of Woodmead--you've met her--
Says the whippoorwills sadly do fret her.
Their concerts at night
So enrage her she'd fight!
Could she catch them, thay'd not soon forget her.


COMPARATIVE

The cantaloupe is honey-sweet,
The peach-cheek round and rosy,
And dearer to our hearts are they
Than e'en the fragrant post;
But sweetest of all cantaloupes,
Most beautiful of all peaches,
Do lack the rare perfection that
The girl from Poulan reaches.


THE R.-H. W.

The train was forty-two minutes late, and the hope of reporting at their respective offices on time had been abandoned by all; but the train made a spurt and then ran from the junction to the brickyards without a stop, and this so elated Col. W. H. Itneigh, of Weddeburn, as to start him on his hobby, the red-headed woodpecker, which he praised as a non-sapsucking destroyer of the eggs of borers, sawyers, and grubs. He was ably seconded by Gen. Bird-ate, of Glen Carlyn, who told of how the R.-H. W. before the war enabled the Missouri farmers to save enough money to arm the bushwhackers. Col. S. Lack, of Hunter's Mill, also stood for his woodpeckership and thought that their killing should be made a crime. Col. S. Myth, of Munson's Hill, however, took the opposite side, claiming that he picked a dead tree for insects and a live one for sap to aid in their digestion. The opposition had a worthy second in Judge Pelt-him, of this city, who remembered that in Alabama he suffered very much on account of the scarcity of hard cider occasioned by the visitation of a large flock of these woodpeckers driven out of the North by the Yankees. At this point in the debate the train reached Long Bridge, and the discussion was temporarily abandoned in order to spend part of the thirty-minute wait in seeing a barge go through the draw, counting the brick-wagons, and admiring the group in front of "Joe's."



E. A. SHREVE & CO.

LABEL PRINTERS

MAY Bldg......7th & E Sts.

WASHINGTON, D.C.


J. E. DYER & CO.

WHOLESALE

GROCERIES, LIQUORS

3330-32 M ST.

WASHINGTON, D.C.





HERNDON

There will be a colt show here on September 9 and 10 which gives promise of being an entertaining affair.

In a game of base ball on the Fourth the Adams Express team of Washington, defeated our local club by a score of 8 to 5. Mr. Tom Buell has had a couple of his college chums, Mr. Hamilton Burch, of New York, and Mr. Anderson, of Montana, spending a part of their vacation here.

The cotillion given by Miss Lydia Russell on the 7th will be long remembered by those present as a very enjoyable occasion. There were many present from Fairfax Court House and Washington. An orchestra from the Capitol City furnished the selections of the evening.
P. D. Q.


PERSONAL

Mrs. Chas. A. Kolb entertained a few friends at her home on the evening of the 10th. She was assisted by her sister Mrs. Julius A. Maedel, of Washington, who is paying a visit to Woodmead.

The Misses Mary and Emma Pelham have shown the true spirit of patriotism and love of country. On the 10th inst. they paid a visit to the tomb of the father of his country. Mrs. S. P. Wright and daughter will leave to-morrow on an extended visit to Castleton, Vt.

Mr. Maurice Palmer and family, of Pleasant Valley, have been spending the past week with Mrs. T. T. Burke.

Mrs. Henry Smith is threatened with typhoid fever.

Miss Mary Pelham returned to her home in Georgia last week.

Miss Emma Pelham will attend the Elks carnival in Baltimore this week as the guest of Mrs. Banks, of Parkwood avenue.

Judge Pelham called on Miss Doremus on Friday evening.

Miss Edith C. Kolb, of Woodmead, spent yesterday visiting friends at Glen Carlyn.


BUYING

LOTS IN BARCROFT IS NOW A

SPECULATION. NEXT SPRING

THEY WILL HAVE DOUBLED

IN VALUE. BUY ONE NOW.

S. P. WRIGHT

Barcroft, - Virginia.


DOWDEN & BRO.

Dealers In

MILL-FEED AND
BAILED HAY

Barcroft Mills,

Barcroft, Virginia.





NEWSLETS

Work is progressing rapidly upon the cottage being erected by Mr. S. P. Wright, and several prospective buyers are beginning to realize that this is one of the many that will soon be building.

Mrs. Mary Payne was the first in Barcroft to enjoy roasting ears while August Hoffman had the first tomatoes. Just now the Barcroft youth finds a plunge in Four-Mile Run quite enjoyable. Bathing suits are to him an unknown quantity, but shrubbery serves to screen him from prying eyes.

Cards are out for the marriage of Miss Martha Horsman and Mr. J. H. Davie, to take place at the residence of the bride on July 21.


DIED

At Washington, on Sunday, July 12, 1903, Mrs. Frances V. Gray, mother of Messrs. Thomas and Oden Gray.

Read the BARCROFT NEWS, one cent per copy.



(No. 5 is missing)






The Barcroft News


VOL. 1. - Barcroft, Va., August 16, 1903. - No.6.

L. G. ORNDORFF

dealer of

GARDEN SEED
FIELD SEED

Agricultural Implements, Fertilizers,
Wagons, Harness, Pumps, & Hardware.
Agent Syracuse Chilled Plows
and Elwood Fence.
203 7th St. N.W., opp. Center Mkt.
Washington, D.C.





THE TOURNAMENT

The tournament at Stoneburner Park last Tuesday was an eminently successful affair. The amateurs, ten in number, were first to enter the lists. Mr. Frank Terrett won first honors, crowning Miss Bessie McKellicott, of Fairfax, Queen of Love and Beauty. Arthur Stoneburner crowned Miss Gertrude Veitch, Clay Downs Miss Ethel Edwards and Eppie Route Miss Mabel Brown first, second and third maids of honor, respectively.

The event of the day, however, was the tilting of the professional class, which resulted in the victory of Thomas Head, Knight of Munson Hill, who selected as his Queen of Love and Beauty Miss Emma Pelham, of Georgia. Richard Cleveland crowned Miss Bernadetta Head, Wm. L. Clark Miss Mabel Edwards and Estler Palmer Miss Helen Veitch as first, second and third maids of honor.

A lively episode was the riding off of the tie between Virginia Boy and Knight of Barcroft, in which five rides at small rings were necessary for a decision.

The coronation took place at 9 o'clock, when the address was delivered by Judge Chas. Pelham, of Barcroft.

As upon several former occasions, the Chief Marshal, Luther Cleveland, proved an efficient and able officer.

Harry Palmer was not "outclassed" among the professionals at Stoneburner's. He simply "Overlook"-ed a ring on his first ride.

Girls who are fond of dancing in the "Royal Set" will do well to keep their eyes on Estler Palmer. Estler has many "taking" ways about him, and taking rings at a tournament is one of them.


Mr. Frank Payne, Jr., has purchased the Washington milk route of Mr. Stoneburner. The News wishes him success and we are confident he will both deserve and attain it.


Mr. Richard Wirt, of the Southern railroad, has returned from a flying trip to Charleston, Savannah, Atlanta, and Birmingham without a scratch! Says he didn't see a wreck on the trip.


The Barcroft News

Published Fortnightly


O. EDW. HARING - - EDITOR

Terms
One year.....$.50
Six months... .25
Per copy...... .01
Advertising rates on application.


August 16, 1903


TALK IS CHEAP

We saw a long article in the Post several days ago about double-tracking the Southern railroad, buying new engines, putting down heavier rails, etc., and next day we read of a disastrous wreck just where all the extra hands were supposed to be at work.


How long, oh, how long will it take Southern railroad people to learn that it is very dangerous for two trains to try to pass each other on the same track, even is one is standing still at the time.


PERSONAL

Mrs. F. C. Bell and son, Warren, have returned from a two days' visit to Mrs. Bradshaw, at Herndon.

Mr. Roy Pritchard, who has been visiting at the Palmer Mansion, left yesterday, accompanied by Miss Nettie Palmer, for Luray Cave, where they will join Mr. Pritchard's parents, also visiting the cave.

Mrs. Allen E. Wilson, of Washington, has been spending a few days with Mrs. Oscar Haring.

Mrs. T. T. Burke left Friday morning, for Pleasant Valley, to spend a few weeks with her son, Maurice Palmer.

Mrs. E. H. Klemroth has returned from an extended stay at Brunswick, Ga. She was much pleased with the far South, but says a longing for Barcroft was ever with her.

Miss Kate Roberson was a caller upon Barcroft friends last week. She didn't miss the opportunity of seeing the baby at the Maryes'.

Miss Mamie Palmer is visiting her uncle at Herndon.




ANNOUNCEMENTS



For Sheriff of Alexandria County

WILLIAM H. PALMER


For Commonwealth's Attorney of
Alexandria County

R. C. L. MONCURE


For State Senator, Fourteenth District

ALEX. J. WEDDERBURN


For Commissioner of Revenue for
Alexandria County

ODEN B. GRAY.





ARLINGTON TIPS

Rev. J. E. Allender spent a part of this week with friends at Garfield, Va.

Mr. and Mrs. Cryer's little baby, who had been sick for some time, died on Wednesday evening of this week. We extend our sympathy to the bereaved parents.

The Misses Harkins from Pleasantville, Mo., spent last Saturday with Rev. Allender.

Mrs. Robert Dye has returned home from a two weeks' visit to her parents up the country.

Mr. and Mrs. A. H. D. Nailor expect to sail for their former home in England soon, accompanied by Mr. Nailor's mother and his mother-in-law.

Miss L. Neidfeldt, of Washington, is spending this week with Mrs. A. H. Reed.


Mr. and Mrs. T. T. Burke have returned from a three days' trip to Culpepper, where they attended the reunion of Mosby's men. Mr. Burke says 125 answered roll call, and a most enjoyable time was had. Addresses were delivered by Maj. Bell, Judge Grimsley, Capt. Foster, Rev. S. Ferguson (the "Fighting Parson"), and Hon. James Marshall, better remembered as "Cyclone Jim."


BAILEY'S X-ROADS

Miss Mary Bergin is visiting Mrs. Head at The Hollies. Mr. T. T. Terrett is the father of a bright and thriving son. He made his presence known on the 4th of August. Mr. Terrett is now the proud father of two sons.

Misses H. Marline and Genevieve Gillen, have returned to Philadelphia after a visit to The Hollies.

Mrs. F. L. Payne, Sr., and her sister, Mrs. Lucy Minnix, left on the 10th to escape some of the hot summer months of Bailey's X-Roads. They will try to keep cool at Atlantic City.


PERSONAL

Mrs. A. W. Rowell, of Washington, has been spending a few days with Mrs. Payne.

Miss Florence Johnston and her niece, Miss Emma Pelham, left on an early train Friday morning for a ten-days' trip to Niagara Falls, with Toronto "on the side."

Col. Tom Burke and Judge Pelham are running wild--all their women folks are away.



HELP WANTED--Reliable col. woman, to cook, wash, iron and do gen. housework for family of three. Address
Mrs. C. A. Kolb
Barcroft, Va.


BARCROFT LOTS

Are 100 x 250 feet

25,000 SQUARE FEET

Liberal Terms

S. P. WRIGHT

Barcroft, - Virginia




TWO STRAW-RIDES

To celebrate the birthdays of Miss Mamie Palmer and Mr. Ben Smith, quite a number of young 'uns enjoyed an old-fashioned straw-ride to Cabin John Bridge on the evening of the 2nd. The party consisted of Misses Ethel, Alice and Emily Smith and Cora Johnston, and Mssrs. Ben and Vernon Smith and John Rhodes, of Arlington; Misses Emma Pelham and Mamie Palmer and Mr. O. Edward Haring, of Barcroft; Mr. Worth Spere, of New York, and Mr. Clarence Leath, of Vienna. Mrs. Henry Smith proved an able chaperon for the party, while Mr. H. T. Works did the piloting act.


Even the threatening sky was not sufficient to deter a party of young Barcroft and Arlington folks from setting out on a straw-ride to Alexandria a few nights since under the able and watchful chaperonage of Mesdames Palmer and Smith. In spite of the vigilance and remonstrance of these ladies, however, utter demoralization ensued when an orchard of inviting appearance hove in sight on the port bow. After making inroads on the fruit (in no wise luscious) order was restored. An address of welcome was delivered by one of the natives of Alexandria professing to be the "chief of the town." On the return the chaperons lost control of their charges, who scattered the hay and defied the law. One feature of the evening (or, rather, early morning) was the record-breaking speed with which a young miss was escorted home by her beau. Very little time could have been spent at the garden-gate. The Misses Smith, of Tarrytown, N.Y. and Pelham, of Georgia, were shining lights--in fact, no lanterns were necessary.




J. E. DYER & CO.

WHOLESALE

GROCERIES, LIQUORS

3330-32 M ST.

WASHINGTON, D.C.


DOWDEN & BRO.

Dealers In

MILL-FEED AND
BAILED HAY

Barcroft Mills,

Barcroft, Virginia.





WHERE THEY BELONG

If the old, played-out, broken-down, worthless engines on the Southern were sent to the "scrap-pile" where they belong, we might not have such long and tedious delays getting into and out of the city. Saturday afternoon a week ago the 4:49 local was more than an hour late leaving Washington--"waiting for an engine," the railroad officials said. Several of the passengers left the train to get dinner in the city and came out on the 6:25 too late to get a warm dinner at home.






The Barcroft News


VOL. 1. - Barcroft, Va., August 30, 1903. - No.7.

The Buzzard

It Accomplishes All Claimed for
It, and Much More.

Through the courtesy of Prof. Langley, a reporter of the News a few nights since was granted the honor of being a passenger upon the "Buzzard" on its first flight. As a public exhibition of this bird's prowess is soon to be made, the professor could make no objections to our describing its construction.

"I am a close student of Nature, said the professor in explaining the "innards" of his fowl, "and I believe that the nearer I adhere thereto the greater will be my success. You will notice how closely I have followed this idea in making the gizzard, liver, heart and lungs; but my greatest difficulty has been in the reproduction of the gall." The News man suggested that some valuable ideas on that score might be obtained from the newspaper men in the treetops thereabout.

The professor and the News reporter were the only ones aboard, and the noble bird rose easily from its perch on top of the houseboat, circled about several times as if undetermined which course to pursue, and then took a bee-line up the river. As Patsy Mann's place hove in sight a look of deep concern o'erspread the professor's face that became one of agony, and only by the most Rooseveltian strenuousness did he prevent the carrion-consumer coming within smelling distance of this odoriferous establishment. On account of a slight disarrangement of the craw, the professor's assistant having neglected do supply a sufficient amount of sand (the reporter had plenty and to spare), a temporary roost was taken on top of the monument, after which the flight was resumed. After passing over Philadelphia, New York, Oyster Bay and Boston, the tail was depressed to starboard and the course changed to the westward. Soon the noise and commotion below notified the travelers that Chicago had been reached. A few minutes more and St. Louis appeared on the horizon; but the professor refused to approach closer to that city, claiming that no effort on his part could prevent the vulture alighting there, so he headed eastward, and within 2:23:09--elapsed time--Barcroft in all her beauty lay slumbering below. Widewater was reached a few minutes later, and the "Buzzard" having demonstrated the skill of her inventor, gracefully perched herself upon the houseboat, all unbeknownst to the slumbering reporters.





The Barcroft News

Published Fortnightly


O. EDW. HARING - - EDITOR
Terms.
One year, by mail.....$.50
Six months, by mail... .25
Per copy..... .01
Advertising rates on application.



August 30, 1903

For greater convenience, and to avoid the further breaking of the Sabbath, the publication-day of the News will be changed to Monday, beginning with the next issue.


OATH OF ALLEGIANCE

The administration, probably believe that many of the dire effects of a strike, and possibly the strike itself, may be averted thereby, has ordered that the oath of allegiance be administered to all employees of the Government Printing Office and of the Navy Yard. There can certainly be no objection to the taking of this oath; but what effect this will have upon a prospective strike is not so apparent. In taking this oath does the employee surrender all right of protest against unfair treatment? And if he considers himself unfairly treated and des protest is he guilty of high treason? It is not unreasonable to suppose that an employee belonging to a trades union is as patriotic and has a much love for his country as one who does not. This move may have the effect of deterring a strike where the provocation is not too great; but we much doubt its efficacy in causing an abandonment of the principle of trades unionism. However, we do not wish to be understood as imputing such motive to the administration. Administer this oath to all, union and non-union, and then the union man will not feel as though he alone were under suspicion. The uniting of tradesmen would be beneficial to all concerned were it possible for the conservative element to control their organizations.




ANNOUNCEMENTS



For Sheriff of Alexandria County

WILLIAM H. PALMER


For Commonwealth's Attorney of
Alexandria County

R. C. L. MONCURE


For State Senator, Fourteenth District

ALEX. J. WEDDERBURN


For Commissioner of Revenue for
Alexandria County

ODEN B. GRAY.





ARLINGTON TIPS

The Misses Margaret Petty and Margaret Robinson are, we are sorry to say, on the sick-list.

Mrs. T. Neidfeldt returned to her home in Washington Monday last. She had been visiting Mrs. Reed.

Miss Jennie Hipkins, of Washington, is visiting friends here.

Mr. Wm. T. Hull is enjoying the company of his son, Mr. J. B. Hull, of Cleveland, O.

Rev. J. E. Allender and Mr. E. T. Burner attended the district conference at Elvan, Va., last week.

Mr. E. S. O'Connor has gone to New York to spend a fortnight.

Mr. R. C. L. Moncure, of Overlook, attorney for the new electric line we are so anxiously awaiting, was here last week on business.


PERSONAL

Mr. J. E. Dyer, of Georgetown, and his family visited Barcroft on Sunday last.

Mrs. S. J. Dewey and her son, Stuart, have been spending some time with Mrs. E. H. Klemroth. Stuart bids fair to be a second Sousa. His rendition of the national airs on his cornet delighted the entire neighborhood.

Mrs. S. P. Wright and Miss Abbie Wright have returned from Castleton, Vt., where they spent the early summer.

Miss Virginia Doremus has been spending a few days this week with Mrs. C. A. Kolb, of Woodmead.

BAILEY'S X-ROADS.

Mr. Rippen, the Bailey's X-Roads miller, is quite ill. We hope he will soon be about again.

Misses Mamie and Bessie Bayless have been spending the past two weeks with their cousin Miss Katie McCoy, of this place.

Mrs. L. E. Payne is quite ill with typhoid fever.

Mr. Noble Rice spent Sunday last with his brother, Nelson.

Mr. F. L. Payne, Sr., purchased of Senator Stuart, of Ashburn, quite a number of his fine thoroughbred milch cows.

Mr. James White, of Arlington, has been spending a few weeks with Mrs. T. Terrett.

Mr. Crupper is running the Cross-Roads mill during the absence of Mr. Rippen.

MICK


The Harings, father and son, have been painting the town red--their roofs.


BARCROFT LOTS

Are 100 x 250 feet

25,000 SQUARE FEET

Liberal Terms

S. P. WRIGHT

Barcroft, - Virginia


J. E. DYER & CO.

WHOLESALE

GROCERIES, LIQUORS

3330-32 M ST.

WASHINGTON, D.C.


NEWSLETS

Judge Pelham has been toting a potato weighing (so he says) 33 ounces about the neighborhood. He claims to have raised the tuber, and challenges the county to show a larger one.

Through the efforts of Sheriff Palmer, Mr. Robert Dye has been appointed special officer for Johnson's Hill, Arlington, etc.


WHERE TO SHOP

Misses Johnston and Pelham have returned from Canada to Miles Away. They represent "Tronter" as the finest shopping city they have ever seen. They say that the Boston House, the Palais Royal, Kahn's and King's Palace, with the 10-cent stores thrown in for good measure, are "not in it" with Eaton's, at Toronto, where 5,000 are employed--equal to the subscription list of the News. They also visited Niagara Falls and the Thousand Islands, and gathered ferns at Watkins' Glen.


LAWN FETE

The Ladies' Aid Society of the Arlington M. E. Church is to give a lawn party on the grounds adjoining the church on the 9th of September, commencing at 5 o'clock and continuing until 11 o'clock p.m. A dainty lunch will be served, and an abundance of ice cream, cake and candy will be offered for sale. Several novel features will serve to entertain the large crowd expected, among which will be that of a fish-pond. Many species of fish will bite at the silver hooks, and those sons of Isaac Walton who boast of catching two-pound bass will be given ample opportunity to demonstrate their skill. A splendid time is promised.


PERSONAL

Mrs. T. T. Burke has returned from a much-enjoyed visit to her son, Mr. Maurice Palmer, of Pleasant Valley.

Miss Lucile Lovelace, of Washington, is spending a few days with her aunt Mrs. F. C. Bell.

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Newlon and daughter Miss Bessie, spent the Sunday before last with the Harings.

Miss Edith C. Kolb, spent Friday last with Miss Haddassah Backus, of Glen Carlyn.


L. G. ORNDORFF

dealer of

GARDEN SEED
FIELD SEED

Agricultural Implements, Fertilizers,
Wagons, Harness, Pumps, & Hardware.
Agent Syracuse Chilled Plows
and Elwood Fence.
203 7th St. N.W., opp. Center Mkt.
Washington, D.C.


DOWDEN & BRO.

Dealers In

MILL-FEED AND
BAILED HAY

Barcroft Mills,

Barcroft, Virginia.












The Barcroft News


VOL. 1. - Barcroft, Va., September 14, 1903. - No.8.

Labor Day Sport

Stoneburner Again Delights a Jolly Crowd.

The Tournament and base ball game at Stoneburner's park on Labor Day proved to be a drawing card. The riding was excellent, and the contest in the professional class for the honor of crowning the queen was hotly contested, several riders of the twelve entered securing all nine rings. Harry Palmer, who secured every ring, even the three-quarter and half-inch, was the victor, and crowned Mrs. R. C. L. Moncure. First maid, by J. S. Blanford, Miss Ida Haas; second, by Estler Palmer, Miss Janie McCallicott; third, by Wm. Herring, Miss Mary Hall.

In the amateur class, Arthur Stoneburner carried off the honor of crowning the queen, having taken eight of the rings. He chose Miss Sarah Wheatley as queen. First maid, by John Stoneburner, Miss Grace Stoneburner; second, by Fenton Fitzhugh, Mrs. Fitzhugh; third, by Clay Downs, Miss Grace Terrett.

Marshal, Luther V. Cleveland; orator of the morning, Walter Varney; orator of the evening, R.C.L.Moncure; judges, Hon. Chas. Pelham and Sheriff Wm. Palmer.

In the base ball game the Eggleston Club crossed bats with the Bailey's X-Roads team and the score seemed to revive memories of '96, the score being 16 to 1 in favor of the Cross-Roads boys.


Flag Raising

Nearly the entire population of Barcroft turned out on Labor Day to witness the raising of the national colors on the new sixty-five-foot flagpole of our patriotic postmaster, Mr. Oscar Haring. Miss Inez Bales, of Braddock Heights, hoisted the noble flag to its lofty position, and a gentle breeze at once wafted it to the northward, as though extending greetings from Dixie to those beyond the Potomac.


Who Can Tell Us

Look at the schedule of rates on the W. & O. division. Take Falls Church, for instance. The round-trip fare is 45 cents. A 25-mile trip yearly ticket costs $7.50. Twelve and one-half round trips could be made for $5.62 1/2, or for $187 1/2 less than by purchasing the 25-trip ticket. This applies as well to nearly all stations on this line. Query: Are certain goods worth more at wholesale than at retail.


The candidates are kissing all babies in the County.



The Barcroft News

Published Fortnightly


O. EDW. HARING - - EDITOR
Terms.
One year, by mail.....$.50
Six months, by mail... .25
Per copy..... .01
Advertising rates on application.



September 14, 1903

A Grain of Comfort

By appointment, several commuters of the W. & O. division of the Southern railway called on Mr. Finley, vice-president of the Southern, on the 2d inst., with a view to remedying conditions on said division. Mr. Finley extended every courtesy to his callers and listened with no small degree of interest to the complaints made and the remedies suggested. He frankly admitted that the road has been managed in a manner far from perfection, and agreed that a vigorous "kick" was fully justifiable. His explanation of the matter was that the immense increase in the road's business, together with the vast improvements now being made on the main line, have taxed it to its utmost capacity, added to which a machinist strike threw his repair work back more than a year. He held out hopes of considerable improvement in the near future, and led the committee to believe that when the new bridge is completed the service will be raised to a much higher standard. Several changes in the schedule and stopping-places of trains were requested; but Mr. Finley made no promises of complying with them. It is believed, however, that some change will soon be made.


Retiring

A lady of Barcroft--you've met her
Had a beau who longed so to get her
That he came once a week;
But his heart failed to speak
So his reticence only did fret her.



Announcements

For Sheriff of Alexandria County

WILLIAM H. PALMER


For Commonwealth's Attorney
of Alexandria County

R. C. L. MONCURE


For State Senator, Fourteenth District,

ALEX. J. WEDDERBURN


For Commissioner of Revenue
for Alexandria County

ODEN B. GRAY



J. E. DYER & CO.

WHOLESALE

GROCERIES, LIQUORS

3330-32 M ST.

WASHINGTON, D.C.


BARCROFT LOTS

Are 100 x 250 feet

25,000 SQUARE FEET

Liberal Terms

S. P. WRIGHT

Barcroft, - Virginia


PERSONAL

Capt. Bales and his daughter, Miss Inez, of Braddock Heights, spent Labor Day with Miss F. T. Johnson.

Mr. W. A Wayne, of the Capital City, was Judge Pelham's guest Monday.

Mr. Walter Whitcraft and Chauncey, his son, of Forest Glen, were here Sunday last.

Mr. S. P. Wright has returned from a visit to his father, residing near Buffalo.

Miss Lydia Milton came down from Paeonian Springs to enjoy a week with Miss Edith Kolb at Woodmead.

Miss Audrey Palmer, of Herndon, has been Miss Mamie Palmer's guest the past fortnight.

Mrs. Chamberlain, who has been spending the summer with the Maryes, has moved to the city in order to have her two daughters take advantage of the schools.

Mrs. H. B. Hoffeldt and Miss Clair A. Erck, were the guests of Mrs. Haring yesterday.

Mr. Roy Pritchard, of Pittsburgh, is visiting Barcroft.

Mr. Nathan Westcott, of Vienna, was here last Monday. Mr. Westcott has purchased a farm near Vienna and intends making for himself a home.

Miss Annie Rowell, of Washington, spent a couple of days last week with Mrs. Mary Payne.


BAILEY'S X-ROADS

Mr. F. L. Payne is building a new cow-stable preparatory to starting in the milk business.

Grant Warner is having a residence built by Theo. Bailey and sons.

Miss Bessie Daniels has been entertaining Miss Mary Flynn, of Washington, and Miss Nettie Daniels, of Lewinsville, Va.

Mrs. L. E. Payne is recovering from an attack of typhoid fever.

Mr. Butler Rippen, we are sorry to say, is still critically ill.

Mrs. F. L. Hale has returned from a visit to her mother at Winchester.


The annual tournament at the Confederate Soldiers' Home near Baltimore on the 12th inst. was a great success. Barcroft was represented by Judge Pelham, Mssrs. W. L. Clark, H. T. Palmer, Howard Fields and others. Miss Pelham, of Poulan, Ga., and Mrs. W. L. Clark went with the Barcrofters.


A Successful Fete

The lawn fete of the Ladies' Aid Society of the M.E.Church on Wednesday evening was a very enjoyable affair. Miss Buckley's lawn, where the party was held, was beautifully decorated with Chinese lanterns, and the booths were artistically and appropriately ornamented. A very novel feature was the fish-pond, and the anglers were so numerous that the finny tribe were completely exhausted. The success of the entertainment is in a great measure due to the untiring zeal of Miss Kate Roberson. The talking machine so kindly loaned by S. Kann & Sons was a source of great amusement.


Boston Sights

Mr. A. J. Todman, who has returned from a trip to Boston, gives and interesting account of the many sights in and about that city. The trains to the many resorts travel at a speed even exceeding that of our own branch road. This part of his story is difficult to believe. He took a trip on a submarine boat, which dived down into the briny deep, and he says that the monsters he saw through the small windows vividly brought tot his mind the days before he signed the pledge. Thousands upon thousands were gathered about the seashore resorts and there seemed to be absolutely no disorder. The trip to Boston was made by steamer from Baltimore, and after a few hours' experience he had fully mastered the art of splicing the main brace.


Newslets

Five passengers stood on the platform at Barcroft and frantically but fruitlessly waved their handkerchiefs as the 7:32 train thundered by at 8:12 on Saturday last. They had to foot it down to the electric cars. When will our new superintendent begin to superintend?

A number of applications for houses in Barcroft were received during the past week. The fact that this is the finest situation about Washington for a suburban residence is getting to be generally recognized, and another year will see great improvement.



DOWDEN & BRO.

Dealers In

MILL-FEED AND
BAILED HAY

Barcroft Mills,

Barcroft, Virginia.


Send in your subscriptions to the News.








The Barcroft News


VOL. 1. - Barcroft, Va., September 28, 1903. - No.9.

Wedding Bells

Mr. Roy Pritchard Captures a Fair Barcroft Maid

On Wednesday evening, Spetember 23, a beautiful wedding was solemnized at the residence of Mr. Wm. H. Palmer, when his daughter, Miss Netti Palmer, became the wife of Mr. Charles Roy Pritchard. The bride was magnificently gowned in French mull over white silk and carried bride roses. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Mr. Gray, of Mount Olivet Church, of Ballston. The spacious parlors were beautifully decorated with ferns, palms, potted plants and trailing vines. The Lohengrin Wedding March was rendered by Miss Zodie Finnell, aunt to the groom. Among those present were Mrs. Mary Barnes, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Palmer, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Dayton, Mr. and Mrs. Winter Barnes, Mr. Harry Palmer, Mr. Mr. Frank Payne, Mr. C. R. Pritchard (father to the groom), Mrs. War Sherman, Mrs Dr. Ashton, Mr. John Finnell and Miss Zodie Finnell. There were many handsome, valuable and useful presents from relatives and friends. Soon after refreshments were served the happy couple left for Washington, and will make an extended tour of the north and West.


Arlington Tips

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin have moved to the city for the winter.

Mrs. J. Rochon has left for New York City.

Col. J. E. Sickles and wife left for Chicago last week to visit Mrs. Anderson, their daughter.

Mr. and Mrs. Shirtzer, of Garfield, Va., visited friends here last week.

Mrs. E. D. Brown has rented here small farm down the road to Mr. Yowell, of Culpeper, who expects to move his family here in the near future.

Mr. Castinet and wife, of Washington, spend last Sunday here.

Mr. and Mrs. S. Bradbury are spending their vacation at Riverton, Va.

Cupid says a wedding march will be played in this neighborhood soon.

It is to be hoped that the Arlington School Board will get to business about October 15. The hot-air work of the summer had about exhausted their energies; but it is hoped they will bury the hatchet for a time.


Mr. and Mrs. J. Dawson-Johnston and their interesting daughters have left the White House and hied to the city for the winter. Miss Dorothy has entered the third grade of the public schools, and Nan the kindergarten.




The Barcroft News

Published Fortnightly


O. EDW. HARING - - EDITOR
Terms.
One year, by mail.....$.50
Six months, by mail... .25
Per copy..... .01
Advertising rates on application.



September 14, 1903

A Step Forward

The officials of the Southern railroad, recognizing the claims of the road's patrons to better service, next Sunday will establish a new schedule for trains on this division, even going so far as to put on another train each way. The committee which a few weeks ago met with Mr. Finley, the vice-president, have had nearly all their requests granted, and many commuters will not be able to spend much more time at home and less in waiting for trains in town. There is ample opportunity for further improvement and the News is firmly convinced that Mr. Finley's promises of betterment will not end here. There are many difficulties to contend with that will vanish or be minimized with the completion of the new bridge. Patience, dear commuters, and you will yet see an up-to-date service on the W. & O. branch. The schedule will be found on another page.




Our Roads

The natives of the county find it comforting to reflect that Columbia Pike and one or two of the lesser highways are, by reason of the recent improvements, in a better condition than ever before to withstand the ravages of the fall, winter, and early spring rains and April thaws.--Alexandria County Monitor.

Columbia Pike is in no better condition now to withstand these ravages than it was last fall. From Palmer's hill to the county line it was impassable for loaded teams for several weeks in the early part of the year and remained in that condition until the "natives" of Fairfax county came down and repaired it so that they could get to the city with their milk and produce. The most comforting reflection of the natives of this district is that the term of the present road commissioner is soon to end, and it is to be hoped that his successor will secure better results, so that in future we will not have to call upon natives of other counties to repair our roads at their expense.



Announcements

For Sheriff of Alexandria County

WILLIAM H. PALMER


For State Senator, Fourteenth District,

ALEX. J. WEDDERBURN


For Commissioner of Revenue
for Alexandria County

ODEN B. GRAY


Two Surprises

Young folks to the number of twenty-seven gathered at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Newlon, of Vienna, on the 16th as a surprise for Miss Bessie Newlon, who was to return from the city that evening. The young ladies, all dressed in white, made a rush for Miss Bessie when she stepped in, and it was some moments before she realized that she was no surrounded by "spooks." she extended them a hearty welcome, and the light fantastic toe was tripped, with Mrs. Devericks kindly furnishing the music, after which all gathered about the sumptuous table of Mrs. Newlon. Another feature of the evening was a cake-walk by two Vienna darkies.


Several of Mrs. Ed. Klemroth's friends surprised her on Thursday evening by calling to congratulate her on her 00th birthday. Mrs. Klem. is a born hostess, and proved equal to the occasion. Cards and refreshments were the order of the evening.


Bailey's X-Roads

School will open on Monday.

Mr. Clyde heiss has returned from Colonial Beach, where he spent several months.

Mr. French Bailey has taken a position in Washington.

Master Vernon Terrett is still living with his grandmother.

Mr. Thomas Rowe has purchased of Mr. Harvey Bailey six acres adjoining his property.

Mr. Will Clark has begun to dig out for the foundation of his new residence and dairy on Columbia pike opposite his old stand. The latter was recently sold to the Alexandria County Water Supply Company. MICK.


Mr. A. J. Tolman has just received the sad news of the death of his father at Boston. The old gentleman had reached the ripe age of nearly ninety-three years.



E. A. SHREVE & CO

LABEL PRINTERS,

May Bldg.............7th & E Sts.,

Washington, D. C.


DOWDEN & BRO.

Dealers In

MILL-FEED AND
BAILED HAY

Barcroft Mills,

Barcroft, Virginia.


PERSONAL

Monsieur M. DuPerow and Mrs. Parker Cutter spent Sunday, the 20th, at Klemwood.

Mr. Wallace Wright, of Forbst Glen, Md., spent last week with Mr. S. P. Wright.

Mr. Chewning counted the ties between Glen Carlyn and Barcroft a few evenings ago, on the way to Palmer's hill, and said he was willing to travel many miles further to reach the habitat of a certain young lady.

Miss Elizabeth Frank, from Staunton, Va., is a guest of Mrs. S. P. Wright.

Glen S. S. Burdette, we are glad to announce, is convalescent and has gone to Atlantic City for a short rest. The General had rather a close call from ptomaine poisoning and was confined to his bed for nine weeks. The boys on the train first were under the impression that the General was trying to dodge the heated debates with a certain constitutional "argufyer" and all around debater durint the heated term.

Miss Emma Pelham has returned to Kleinberg college, in Nelson county, Va., where she will graduate next June. We hope to have her with us next year. Miss Emma was a very pleasant and agreeable addition to the "younger set" at Barcroft during the past summer.

Master Stuart Dewey, of Washington, has been visting Mrs. Klemroth at Klemwood.

Rev. Mr. Stokely filled the pulpit at Arlington yesterday.

Mrs. Walter Palmer, of Herndon, and Mrs. War Sherman, of Boston, are Mrs. W. H. Palmer's guests.


There are meetings of joy
And partings of grief.
An inconstant lover
Is worse than a thief.


NEW SCHEDULE

Beginning October 4 trains will reach Washington at 6:57, 7:40, 8:30and 8:36 a. m. and 1:25 and 3:00 p.m. They leave there at 8:00 a.m. and 1:00, 4:30, 4:35, 5:00 and 6:25 p.m. Train arriving at 8:35 p.m. and leaving at 4:30 p.m. is the express.


Inquries for Barcroft lots were received the past week form Buffalo, N.Y., and Detroit, Mich.



FOR SALE -- Almost new, upright piano; $100 cash or $125 on easy terms. Address Box 4, Barcroft, Va.


J. E. DYER & CO.

WHOLESALE

GROCERIES, LIQUORS

3330-32 M ST.

WASHINGTON, D.C.


OWN YOUR HOME

Small payments will soon enable you to live under your own roof in Barcroft.

S. P. Wright
Barcroft, Virginia









The Barcroft News


VOL. 1. - Barcroft, Va., October 12, 1903. - No.10.

Mr. Burlap's Story

Mr. Burlap had just returned from his fishing trip to Occoquan, and Mrs. Burlap met him at the depot. Walking homeward with her, he lit his pipe and was telling of the enormous bass he cam in an ace of catching.

"George," said Mrs. B., "your story is fishy enough; but that pipe's foul."

He considerately knocked the pipe on a fence-post and stuck it in his pistol-pocket.

"Now, my dear," said he, "I hope I may die if that fish wasn't at least -- Gee whiz! Hold on! Here, hold my coat and vest."

He had neglected knocking the fire from his pipe; but he succeeded in smothering the incipient conflagration, and a liberal application of witch hazel eased the pain, and he resumed:

"As I was saying, Johnson and I had both hooked the same fish, and were both reeling in for dear life when -- My goodness, Cordelia. What's this?"

A sheet of tanglefoot had been left upon a chair and now clung tenaciously to quite a large area in the immediate vicinity of the crimson souvenir of his first mishap. Soap, pearline, sapolio and kerosene were resorted to in vain, and the gum was removed only by means of a vigorous application of sandpaper.


Dangerous

The high grading on the pike between the railroad and Four-Mile Run was the other day the scene of what came near being a serious accident, when Mr. Geo. Klein's horse became frightened and backed the wagon off, spilling about eighty gallons of milk and bruising Mr. Klein considerably. This makes the fourth time such a mishap has occurred, and it's about time a railing or some other protection was placed along the side of this dangerous place.




John R. McLean is trying to get the right of way across Aqueduct bridge and to the new Union station for his electric road. His success will mean much to this county. This is not the first attempt at breaking the monopoly of the Pa. R. R.Co., and the outcome will be watched with much interest.




Americans built bridges in Africa within ninety days from letting of contract. It's been two years since work was started on the new bridge across the river, and we would not be surprised if President Gorman in 1905 should ride on the first train to cross it.




Chamboluki is having a rather serious time shedding his teeth.




The Barcroft News

Published Fortnightly


O. EDW. HARING - - EDITOR
Terms.
One year, by mail.....$.50
Six months, by mail... .25
Per copy..... .01
Advertising rates on application.



October 12, 1903

MILLER CASE

Our President does not mince words. His position on the point of organized labor in the G.P.O. is so clearly defined as to preclude misunderstanding. That there has heretofore been quasi-recognition of unionism in the printing office seems evident. Trades unions should have been content with this. Threats of defeating Mr. Roosevelt next year on account of the stand he has taken will make more enemies than friends for united labor, and it is to be hoped that such threats do not emanate from the conservative, sober-minded advocates of the workingman's rights.




New Schedule

The new schedule has not been in force for a week, much to the delight of many commuters. There was a mistake made, however, in timing the second train to reach town at 7:40. This is not sufficient latitude to allow for the frequent and at present unavoidable dleays between the junction and town, and, as a consequence, a number of the "8-o'clock people" are forced to take the early train. The commuters hate dreadfully to go to Mr. Finley about the matter after his granting them just what they asked; but they need no be, for if here were fully convinced of the facts he would no doubt make a change. Get this train in at 7:30 and all the commuters will praise the management of our road.




The county political pot ought to boil. Several candidates have money to burn.




Still they come! Several parties were here the past week inspecting Barcroft's many handsome building-sites.




What is the matter with our road supervisor? Does he mean to prevent people using Columbia Pike? The bridge near Dr. Corbett's has been a veritable death-trap for several days. Will the "natives" of Fairfax county be forced to repair that bridge, as they did the roads last winter? Somebody is liable to lose votes if that bridge remains in its present condition until November 3.




Announcements

For Sheriff of Alexandria County

WILLIAM H. PALMER


For State Senator, Fourteenth District,

ALEX. J. WEDDERBURN


For Commissioner of Revenue
for Alexandria County

ODEN B. GRAY


NEWSLETTS The governors of North Carolina and South Carolina would not have found time for drinks between the arrivals of the three up-trains last Friday evening.

Mr. T. T. Burke has opened up his stone quarry and is selling a fine grade of granite to Glen Carlyn builders. this quarry has an almost inexhaustible supply of excellent stone, and we hope soon to see it used in constructing residences in Barcroft.

Mr. George Head has sold his sixty-acre farm at Merrifield to Mr. Thomas Estress.

It is said that Judge Pelham has taught a woodcock to speak a whole sentence.

It is with regret that we announce the death last Friday of the infoant of Mr. T. T. Terrett, Jr., at Bailey's X-Roads.

Three young men, on mischief bent, stuffed rags into the chimney of the Bailey's Cross-Roads school-house and tore up some fence-posts, anticipating Halloween by several weeks.

Judge Pelham had a door and window cut in one of his big pumpkins and will house three dogs in it.


ARLINGTON TIPS

Mr. Robert R. Dye has sold his house and lot to Mrs. Birch, of Ballston.

Mr. Walter Palmer, of Herndon, was here last week.

Mr. John Hipkins, of Washington, brother-in-law of Mr. R. W. Johnson, died last week.

Mr. Harry Dye and bride have returned home.

Rev. Graves, of Falls Church, is holding a series of meetings at the Columbia school-house.




GAME LAWS

A rig'd enforcement of game-laws would afford ample protection to game -- something sorely needed. It's exasperating to see a crowd of strangers scouring the woods and killing off what little game is left. Make an example of a few of these marauders and the evil will abate.

FOR SALE

Almost new, upright piano; $100 cash or $125 on easty terms. Address Box4, Barcroft, Va.


J. E. DYER & CO.

WHOLESALE

GROCERIES, LIQUORS

3330-32 M ST.

WASHINGTON, D.C.


PERSONAL

Miss Coyne Fletcher, who has just returned from abroad, spent last Sunday with Miss Johnston at Miles Away. Miss F. brought with her hundreds of interesting and instructive pictures of places she visited. After riding over the roads in Ireland she is lcear upon the point that it would be wise in Mr. Carnegie to hold up on his gifts to libraries and devote some of his surplus cash to building good roads in Virginia.

Mr. and Mrs. Parker Cutter, Misses Cook and Thatcher, Monsieur M. DuPerow and Mr. C. C. Williams were the guests of Mrs. Klemroth at Klemwood a week ago yesterday.

Misses Ethel Smith and Mamie Palmer spent the evening with Miss Doremus one say last week.

Mr. S. P. Wright is playing a better game of high-five and has been admitted to full membership in the club.

Mr. Chewning and Miss Mamie Palmer are the champion ping-pong players.

Mrs. Mary Payne has sold the Barcroft mill to Mr. Moler Stoneburner, who intends making improvements soon.

Mrs. Margaret Smith has made public sale of her personal property and will go to Connecticut.

Mrs. Klemroth entertained several lady friends at luncheon on Friday afternoon.

The Misses Constance and Hadassah Backus and Ella and Jennie Olcutt, of Glen Carlyn, spend the last day of their vacation with Miss Edith Kolb at Woodmead. Tennis and other games were resorted to in the endeavor to forget that the next day they'd have to go back to school.

Mrs. C. Noland, of France, has been visiting her daughter, Mrs. Chas. Garvey, and her newly-arrived granddaughter. Mrs. Noland left for New York last Saturday.

Mrs. S. T. Marye gave a dinner party on Wednesday in honor of her cousin, Miss Estelle Doremus.

Miss Estelle Doremus, of Closter, N.J., has been spending the past week here with her cousin, Mrs. Oscar Haring. Miss Doremus has received much attention during her stay among us, dinners, luncheons and theater-parties being given in her honor.

Miss Edith Kolb entertained a number of young city people at Woodmead last Saturday a week ago. Tennis was indulged in.





DOWDEN & BRO.,

Dealers in

MILL-FEED and BALED HAY

Barcroft Mills

Barcroft, Virginia


OWN YOUR HOME

Small payments will soon enable you to live under your own roof in Barcroft.

S. P. Wright
Barcroft, Virginia









Barcroft News


VOL. 1. - Barcroft, Va., October 26, 1903. - No.11.

A GOOD MAN GONE

Rev. J. E. Allender, after a lingering illness of several weeks, died at Sibley Hospital, Washington, on the 22d instant and was buried at Ivy Hill Cemetery, this county, on Saturday. Mr. Allender had charge of the Methodist Church at Arlington for several years and had endeared himself to the entire community. He was a gifted and eloquent speaker, and had unusual ability as an organizer. His life was blameless, and he died, as all Christians should, with a firm belief that he was entering a blissful home beyond the skies.

He leaves three daughters and a son to mourn his departure, his wife having preceded him about a year to her reward in heaven. The entire community loved, respected and honored this good man and sympathize with his bereaved children.




NEWSLETTS

Work on the new school-house at Columbia station is progressing rapidly. Excavation for the foundation has been made and most of the material is on hand.

The ladies of Trinity P. E. Church will give an oyster supper at St. John's Episcopal Orphanage, Arlington, on Wednesday evening the 28th instant. Supper, 25cts. Ice cream and cake will also be served and fancy articles will also be for sale. The beauty and chivalry of Alexandria County are expected to be present and the young man who does not attend may hear that his girl has "gone off with a handsomer man."

Miss Lena Louise Hartman and Mr. Frank H. Bushby were married on the 21st inst., and will be at home to their numerous friends at 1137 Tenth street, Washington, D.C. after Nov. 15. We congratulate our friend Mr. Bushby upon his good luck and wish both bride and groom a long and happy life.

We hear and also read in the papers that there are to be elections in Maryland, New York, Ohio and other States the coming week; but if you want to hear "politics as in politics" just come over into Alexandria county and you will see and hear enough to last you until the coming preidential election at least.

Many regrets are expressed by new member sof the High-Five Club that Judge Pelham and his formidable partner have found it expedient to enroll themselves as honorary instead of active members.

Mr. Lemuel Dowden has purchased Mrs. Margaret Smith's property.




The Barcroft News

Published Fortnightly


O. EDW. HARING - - EDITOR
Terms.
One year, by mail.....$.50
Six months, by mail... .25
Per copy..... .01
Advertising rates on application.



October 26, 1903

THE BRIDGE MONOPOLY

The disaster at Long Bridge this week is calculated to bring to the attention of a fair-minded observer a condition of affairs that is deplorable. The fact that the giving away of a portion of this bridge should almost completely cutoff all communication southward is a strong argument in favor of more bridges across the Potomac. And why have we no more? Simply because the Pennsylvania Railway Company is able to out-lobby any competitor and prevent the granting of permission to build any more. The monopoly of this bridge has served more than all other causes combined to retard development of the entire northern portion of Virginia. In all justice to this State there should be no fewer than eight bridges across the Potomac. And but little improvement can be hoped for with the completion of the bridge now building, for exorbitant charges will serve to keep out competitive lines.


EXPECTED

The costly and fatal accident at Long Bridge might have been foreseen and foretold more than a generation ago. Its shaking timbers and weather-beaten appearance have long held a dread foreboding for those traveling to and from the National Capital over this particular route. That an appalling loss of life did not result can be due only to the working of a Devine Providence.


I respectfully announce myself as a candidate for constable of the Arlington district, Alexandria county.

HARRY COLLINS



ANNOUNCEMENTS



For Sheriff of Alexandria County

WILLIAM H. PALMER.


For Commissioner of Revenue
for Alexandria County

ODEN B. GRAY.


For Constable Arlington District, Alex Co.,

HARRY COLLINS.


JUST FOR FUN

Barcrofters were very highly amused one evening last week at an entertainment at Mr. Marye's. Our local artist had clandestinely made sketches of all present and exhibited them by shadow pictures. Among these were: Mrs. Shick, with her market-basket, catching a train; Judge Pelham, with his "shawl-neck" and "warhorse" game roosters; Miss Johnston welcomed home by a string of cats; Mrs. Klemroth gathering up her skirts in a rainstorm; Mr. and Mrs. Haring in Broadway, New York, after the settlement of the Harlem litigation; Mrs. S. A. Marye in a battle-royal with Captain Kidd; Miss Virgie Doremus and one of her devoted admirers; the residence Miss Estelle Doremus hopes to build in Barcroft; Mrs. Syd Marye in her red-devil automobile on Columbia pike; Mr. Syd Marye hastening up Arlington avenue, a pair of scales in his hand, bawling out "it's a boy! It's a boy!" to everyone; and our village blacksmith.

Everyone enjoyed the hits, even when they struck home.

Mrs. W. W. Chamberlain and Mr. Edward Haring are deserving of much credit for having conceived and so successfully carried out the novel entertainment.


The Wright cottage, on Columbia pike, was again visited last Sunday by several couples who desire to domicile themselves in this vicinity. Others who seem to contemplate becoming coupled in the near future also inspected the premises and surroundings.


CONSIDERATE

Last Tuesday the 4:36 local left town about ten minutes ahead of the 4:30 express. It was the first W. & O. train to cross after the accident. The express would have gone first, but the Falls Church people aboard became so frightened at the prospect that the management, in pity, concluded to send the local ahead as a test of the temporary structure. Each passenger had his window up -- ostensibly to see what was going on, but really in order to climb out if the draw went down. Upon reaching terra firma on this side a general sigh of relief was heard, and numerous handkerchiefs were brought into service to mop the moisture from cold brows.


Mr. Charles D. Erck, formerly of Barcroft, is now established in business at Buffalo, N.Y. and bids fair to become a prosperous merchant. Mr. Erck possesses many of those qualities of mind and heart which go to make the successful business man. His friends in Barcroft will rejoice at his prosperity.



FOR SALE

Almost new, upright piano; $100 cash or $125 on easy terms. Address Box 4, Barcroft, Va.


J. E. DYER & CO.

WHOLESALE

GROCERIES, LIQUORS

3330-32 M ST.

WASHINGTON, D.C.


PERSONAL

Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rusesll, of Washington, were guests of the Maryes yesterday.

Miss Annie Rowell and other Washington friends have been visiting Mrs. Mary Payne.

Mrs. S. T. Marye and daughter, who have been spending a few days visiting friends in town, returned last Monday.

Judge John E. Ray, of Woodridge, D.C., was a guest at Miles Away one evening last week.

Mrs. S. A. Marye, who has been indisposed for a few days, is very much improved.

Miss Estelle Doremus, of Closter, N.J., wo had been enlivening Barcroft during her ten days' visit to Mrs. Oscar Haring, has returned home.

We are glad to see that Gen. Burdett is sufficiently recovered from his recent severe illness to make short trips to the seaside, and we trust his contemplated visit to the Blueridge Mountains will restore him to perfect health.

Mr. Geo. Talburtt, of Washington, paid our town a business call on Wednesday.

Mrs. Caffacy, of Washington, was the guest of Mrs. Will C. Wilbert last week.


BAILEY'S X-ROADS

Mr. T. E. Salls has been quite ill the past week.

Mr. Wm. H. Burns died at Lincolnia last Tuesday from a two years' illness.

Mr. Ernest Lacey is improving the estate of the late J. B. Lacey.

A revival is in progress at the Methodist Church at Lincolnia.

Mssrs. Lemuel Dowden and L. E. Payne are negotiating for the Plumber tract of land.

Mr. T. Terrett, jr., has cornered the straw market here.

Mr. John O'Shaughnessey is making preparations for erecting a new barn.

Mr. H. J. Mortimer, of Charlottesville, Va., is spending a few days with Mrs. A. B. Rippen.

Mr. Terrett is improving the entrance to his mill.


To prove how far his shotgun would carry, August Hoffman pointed it at Sidney Lucas, 150 yards off, and pressed the trigger. August proved his claim, and Sidney is picking the shot from his arm.


L. E. PAYNE

Dealer of

GROCERIES, MILL FEED, DRY GOODS

BAILEY'S X-ROADS

VIRGINIA


OWN YOUR HOME

Small payments will soon enable you to live under your own roof in Barcroft.

S. P. Wright
Barcroft, Virginia


E. A. SHREVE & CO.,

LABEL PRINTERS,

MAY Bldg...........7th & E. Sts

WASHINGTON, D.C.






The Barcroft News


Barcroft, Va., November 4, 1903.

EXTRA!



THE RESULT

The Vote in Washington District Yesterday.


Up to the time this paper went to press these were the only results we could obtain. The editor regrets he could not obtain more.
For State Senate:

    Lewis H. Machen . . . .286
    F. M. Brooks . . . . .70

For Delegate:

    James R. Caton . . . . 382


ARLINGTON DISTRICT

For Justice:

    M. L. Garrison . . . . . 75
    W. W. Douglas . . . . . 165
    F. S. Corbett . . . . . 157

For Attorney:

    R. W. Johnston . . . . . 178
    Crandall Mackey . . . . .171
    W. U. Varney . . . . . .. 41

For Sheriff:

    Homer T. Works . . . . . 19
    Geo. Marcey . . . . . . 110
    Wm. H. Palmer . . . . . .207
    Wm. Duncan . . . . . . .. 62

For Treasurer:

    W. C. Wilbert . . . . . . 250 R. W. Darby . . . . . . . 161

For Commissioner:

    O. B. Gray . . . . . . . . 16 H. R. Thomas . . . . . . . 89 C. B. Graham . . . . . . .164 H. L. Homes . . . . . . . 102

Yesterday's election was carried out more quietly than any election that has been held in Alexandria County for years.


PLEASING NEWS

Miss Lena Louise Hartman and Mr. Frank H. Bushby were married on the 21st inst., and will be at home to their numerous friends at 1137 Tenth street, Washington, D. C. after Nov. 15. We congratulate our good friend, Mr. Bushby upon his good luck and wish both bride and groom a long and happy life.




The Barcroft News

Published Fortnightly


O. EDW. HARING - - EDITOR
Terms.
One year, by mail.....$.50
Six months, by mail... .25
Per copy..... .01
Advertising rates on application.



November 4, 1903

THE BRIDGE MONOPOLY

The disaster at Long Bridge this week is calculated to bring to the attention of a fair-minded observer a condition of affairs that is deplorable. The fact that the giving away of a portion of this bridge should almost completely cutoff all communication southward is a strong argument in favor of more bridges across the Potomac. And why have we no more? Simply because the Pennsylvania Railway Company is able to out-lobby any competitor and prevent the granting of permission to build any more. The monopoly of this bridge has served more than all other causes combined to retard development of the entire northern portion of Virginia. In all justice to this State there should be no fewer than eight bridges across the Potomac. And but little improvement can be hoped for with the completion of the bridge now building, for exorbitant charges will serve to keep out competitive lines.


EXPECTED

The costly and fatal accident at Long Bridge might have been foreseen and foretold more than a generation ago. Its shaking timbers and weather-beaten appearance have long held a dread foreboding for those traveling to and from the National Capital over this particular route. That an appalling loss of life did not result can be due only to the working of a Devine Providence.


I respectfully announce myself as a candidate for constable of the Arlington district, Alexandria county.

HARRY COLLINS



ANNOUNCEMENTS



For Sheriff of Alexandria County

WILLIAM H. PALMER.


For Commissioner of Revenue
for Alexandria County

ODEN B. GRAY.


For Constable Arlington District, Alex Co.,

HARRY COLLINS.


JUST FOR FUN

Barcrofters were very highly amused one evening last week at an entertainment at Mr. Marye's. Our local artist had clandestinely made sketches of all present and exhibited them by shadow pictures. Among these were: Mrs. Shick, with her market-basket, catching a train; Judge Pelham, with his "shawl-neck" and "warhorse" game roosters; Miss Johnston welcomed home by a string of cats; Mrs. Klemroth gathering up her skirts in a rainstorm; Mr. and Mrs. Haring in Broadway, New York, after the settlement of the Harlem litigation; Mrs. S. A. Marye in a battle-royal with Captain Kidd; Miss Virgie Doremus and one of her devoted admirers; the residence Miss Estelle Doremus hopes to build in Barcroft; Mrs. Syd Marye in her red-devil automobile on Columbia pike; Mr. Syd Marye hastening up Arlington avenue, a pair of scales in his hand, bawling out "it's a boy! It's a boy!" to everyone; and our village blacksmith.

Everyone enjoyed the hits, even when they struck home.

Mrs. W. W. Chamberlain and Mr. Edward Haring are deserving of much credit for having conceived and so successfully carried out the novel entertainment.


The Wright cottage, on Columbia pike, was again visited last Sunday by several couples who desire to domicile themselves in this vicinity. Others who seem to contemplate becoming coupled in the near future also inspected the premises and surroundings.


CONSIDERATE

Last Tuesday the 4:36 local left town about ten minutes ahead of the 4:30 express. It was the first W. & O. train to cross after the accident. The express would have gone first, but the Falls Church people aboard became so frightened at the prospect that the management, in pity, concluded to send the local ahead as a test of the temporary structure. Each passenger had his window up -- ostensibly to see what was going on, but really in order to climb out if the draw went down. Upon reaching terra firma on this side a general sigh of relief was heard, and numerous handkerchiefs were brought into service to mop the moisture from cold brows.


Mr. Charles D. Erck, formerly of Barcroft, is now established in business at Buffalo, N.Y. and bids fair to become a prosperous merchant. Mr. Erck possesses many of those qualities of mind and heart which go to make the successful business man. His friends in Barcroft will rejoice at his prosperity.



FOR SALE

Almost new, upright piano; $100 cash or $125 on easy terms. Address Box 4, Barcroft, Va.


J. E. DYER & CO.

WHOLESALE

GROCERIES, LIQUORS

3330-32 M ST.

WASHINGTON, D.C.


PERSONAL

Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rusesll, of Washington, were guests of the Maryes yesterday.

Miss Annie Rowell and other Washington friends have been visiting Mrs. Mary Payne.

Mrs. S. T. Marye and daughter, who have been spending a few days visiting friends in town, returned last Monday.

Judge John E. Ray, of Woodridge, D.C., was a guest at Miles Away one evening last week.

Mrs. S. A. Marye, who has been indisposed for a few days, is very much improved.

Miss Estelle Doremus, of Closter, N.J., wo had been enlivening Barcroft during her ten days' visit to Mrs. Oscar Haring, has returned home.

We are glad to see that Gen. Burdett is sufficiently recovered from his recent severe illness to make short trips to the seaside, and we trust his contemplated visit to the Blueridge Mountains will restore him to perfect health.

Mr. Geo. Talburtt, of Washington, paid our town a business call on Wednesday.

Mrs. Caffacy, of Washington, was the guest of Mrs. Will C. Wilbert last week.


BAILEY'S X-ROADS

Mr. T. E. Salls has been quite ill the past week.

Mr. Wm. H. Burns died at Lincolnia last Tuesday from a two years' illness.

Mr. Ernest Lacey is improving the estate of the late J. B. Lacey.

A revival is in progress at the Methodist Church at Lincolnia.

Mssrs. Lemuel Dowden and L. E. Payne are negotiating for the Plumber tract of land.

Mr. T. Terrett, jr., has cornered the straw market here.

Mr. John O'Shaughnessey is making preparations for erecting a new barn.

Mr. H. J. Mortimer, of Charlottesville, Va., is spending a few days with Mrs. A. B. Rippen.

Mr. Terrett is improving the entrance to his mill.


To prove how far his shotgun would carry, August Hoffman pointed it at Sidney Lucas, 150 yards off, and pressed the trigger. August proved his claim, and Sidney is picking the shot from his arm.


L. E. PAYNE

Dealer of

GROCERIES, MILL FEED, DRY GOODS

BAILEY'S X-ROADS

VIRGINIA


OWN YOUR HOME

Small payments will soon enable you to live under your own roof in Barcroft.

S. P. Wright
Barcroft, Virginia


E. A. SHREVE & CO.,

LABEL PRINTERS,

MAY Bldg...........7th & E. Sts

WASHINGTON, D.C.






The Barcroft News


VOL. 1. - Barcroft, Va., November 9, 1903. No. 12

EXTRA!



WITH THE SPOOKS


Mrs. Oscar Haring entertained a large number of Barcrofters on Halloween in a very novel and unique manner. Candles set in pumpkins which had been cut to represent most hideous faces and candalebra made of turnips and candies cast a weird light upon the assemblage as they sat and listened to stories of the spirits, and when the door opened and a ghost walked in things seemed so real that one young mang grasped his sweetheart's hadn, fearing he would be robbed of her, or, rather, this was his explanation of the situation when the lights were suddenly turned on. Several solos were sung, with Miss Doremus and Mrs. Chamberlain as accompanists on the piano. Dancing was indulged in until the shrill voice of one of Judge Pelham's Shawl-neck roosters gave warning of the approach of midnight, when, as is the time-honored custom, the men and boys lined up on one side of the room with the matrons and maids on the other for the Virginia reel. the music was lively, and such "do-ce-do-ing," "prancing" "racking back," had not been seen in this neck of the woods for many moons. Sheriff Palmer led the dance in true Chantilly style. In the contest at bobbing for apples Mr. Wright carried off first honors, with Esther Palmer as a good second.


ARLINGTON TIPS

Mr. L. M. Walter returned last Thursday from a three days' trip to his native home in Kentucky.

Mr. E. Bradbury has broken ground for his new residence.

Mrs. S. E. Bartlet has moved to the city for the winter.

Mr. Wm. Plauger and family have moved to Alexandria, where they intend to make their future home.

Mr. F. S. Corbett has completed his contract of paving the roads and streets of Fort Myer. Mr. Corbett understands road working thoroughly.

Our deputy sheriff and jailor, Chas. Kronk, of Overlook, was in town the first of this week.

Mr. H. B. Terrett has a new but young clerk "it's a boy."


The regular November term of Judge Whitney's court begins to-day. We understand that several serious charges are pending against prominent commuters on the 4:35 train. The officers of that court are said to have unearthed considerabe devilment in and about the "Woodyard" which escaped the attention of "Bristow's Bloodhounds." Judge W. never allows the guilty to escape.




The Barcroft News

Published Fortnightly


O. EDW. HARING - - EDITOR
Terms.
One year, by mail.....$.50
Six months, by mail... .25
Per copy..... .01
Advertising rates on application.



November 9, 1903

IS IT TOO MUCH?

Let's be optimistic. Let's hope that the campaign promises of Mr. Crandall Mackey, our newly-elected commonwealth attorney, were made in good faith. should he live up to his promises (and we believe he will) and Sheriff Palmer be equally zealous in wiping the stain from the fair name of our community--we also believe he will be--the time may yet come when "Alexandria county" and "debauchery" will no longer be considered synonymous terms. With these two officers rests the power of redemption, and we earnestly hope they will not prove recrezant to the trust reposed in them.


Notwithstanding the rigid enforcement of the registration law, disfranchising most of the colored people of this county, Mr. Williams, a colored man, was elected to fill a county office by a greater majority than was given any other man who ran on the 3d inst. Who, faced wtih such a fact, can maintain that the people of the south are prejudiced against the negro race?


Rumor has it that Mr. Johnston, the present incumbent, will contest the election of Mr. Mackey as commonwealth attorney. The latter had a plurality of but two votes. A change in this office is very much to be desired, and we hope this attempt will prove futile.


There is a movement on foot to raise a fund for the building of a city hall in Barcroft. Several of our citizens are enthusiastic upon the subject, and a meeting will be held soon in order to formulate plans.



PIANOS

AND MERITORIOUS NOVELTIES AND
PATENTED ARTICLES

THE ERCK SPECIALTY CO.

ROOM 54

COAL AND IRON EXCHANGE

BUFFALO -- NEW YORK


OFFICIAL VOTE


For State Senate:

    Lewis H. Machen . . . .535
    F. M. Brooks . . . . .155

For Delegate:

    James R. Caton . . . . 743

For Attorney:

    R. W. Johnston . . . . . 321
    Crandall Mackey . . . . .323
    W. U. Varney . . . . . ..119

For Sheriff:

    Homer T. Works . . . . . 11
    Geo. Marcey . . . . . . 183
    Wm. H. Palmer . . . . . .353
    Wm. Duncan . . . . . . ..208

For Treasurer:

    W. C. Wilbert . . . . . . 464 R. W. Darby . . . . . . . 301

For Commissioner:

    O. B. Gray . . . . . . . . 73 H. R. Thomas . . . . . . .143 C. B. Graham . . . . . . .330 H. L. Homes . . . . . . . 222


ARLINGTON DISTRICT

For Justice:

    M. F Birch . . . . . . 130
    W. L. Smith . . . . . . 93
    E. F. Thompson . . . . .155
    M. C. Stevens . . . . . .59
    J. R. Hagan . . . . . . 133
    C. B. Wadleigh . . . . .111
    A. B. East . . . . . . .172
    D. Stummets . . . . . . .88

For Constable:

    J. H. Collins . . . . . . 97
    E. E. Veitch . . . . . . 201
    P. E. Woodyard . . . . . .88

For Supervisor:

    M. L. Garrison . . . . . .75
    W. W. Douglas . . . . . .165
    F. S. Corbett . . . . . .157
    Wm. Duncan . . . . . . .. 62

For Overseer of Poor:

    J. M. Williams . . . . . .375


JEFFERSON DISTRICT

For Justice:

    Louis Dalbert . . . . . .50
    J. F. Haney . . . . . . .67
    I. C. Burrell . . . . . .76
    W. H. Wise . . . . . . . 58
    John W. Slater . . . . . 63
    W. C. Weadon . . . . . . 24
    John Marcher . . . . . . 43

For Constable:

    James Burke . . . . . . .60
    Wm. Winston . . . . . . .20
    John H. Cornell . . . . .98

For Supervisor:

    D. N. Rust . . . . . . . 194


WASHINGTON DISTRICT

For Justice:

    E. J. Marcey . . . . . .100
    W. W. Moody . . . . . . .45
    R. W. Saunders . . . . .111
    T. A. R. Taff . . . . . .46
    John S. Smith . . . . . .48

For Constable:

    Wm. H. Payne . . . . . . 79
    John E. Payne . . . . . .24
    Joseph W. Evans . . . . .86

For Supervisor:

    Geo. W. Donaldson . . . . 3
    W. N. Febrey . . . . . . 79
    C. J. Costolow . . . . . 70


PERSONAL

Mr. Kolband his family expect to move into the city this week for the winter months. We had hoped they would remain at Woodmead until after Christmas and will miss them very much.

Miss Bessie Newlon, of Vienna paid a visit to Mrs. Haring last week and honored the News with a call.

Mr. Wayne, of Washington, and Mssrs. Jones and Ollcot, of Glen Carlyn, were visitors at Miles Away on the 1st.

Mr. Lloyd Brown, of Washington, spent last Sunday with Mr. Sidney Lucas at Miles Away.

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Pritchard have returned from their bridal trip through the Northwest. We sincerely hope they settle in Barcroft, where Mrs. Pritchard has lived from her childhood. They seem to have enjoyed their honeymoon amazingly and are looking their very best.

Mr. and Mrs. Wright are moving into their new cottage on Columbia Pike.

Mr. T. R. Stoneburner will move into the "White House" on the 15th inst.

Mrs. Belle R. Dewey and son, Stuart, were the guests of Mrs. Klemroth at Klemwood sunday of last week.

Major Jas. R. Schick, of Roanoke, spent a few days week before last with his sister, Mrs. Klemroth, at Klemwood.

Mrs. Fox has been somewhat indisposed in Washington for several days, but is now getting better and hopes to attend the housewarming in the Wright cottage on Columbia Pike before Thanksgiving Day.

Judge Pelham spent yesterday with Col. Slack, at Hunter's Mill.


BAILEY'S X-ROADS

Mr. O'Shaughnessey is putting the finishing touches on his new barn.

On Wednesday evening there will be an oyster supper on the newly-acquired property of Lemuel Dowden recently owned by Mrs. williams.

The little daughter of James Carter, of Lincolnia, is dead.

Mr. M. C. Hunter has been quite ill the past week.

Mr. Burdett Hunter is clerking for t. Terrett & Son.


J. E. DYER & CO.

WHOLESALE

GROCERIES, LIQUORS

3330-32 M ST.

WASHINGTON, D.C.


L. E. PAYNE

Dealer of

GROCERIES, MILL FEED, DRY GOODS

BAILEY'S X-ROADS

VIRGINIA


OWN YOUR HOME

Small payments will soon enable you to live under your own roof in Barcroft.

S. P. Wright
Barcroft, Virginia









Barcroft News


VOL. 1. - Barcroft, Va., November 23, 1903. - No.13.

THE CONTEST

The answers were filed Saturday evening in the contest case for commonwealth attorney. If the charges made can be proved, there is a probability of Mr. Varney winning out.


BAILEY'S X-ROADS

Mr. O'Shaughnessey is finishing his barn.

On Wednesday evening there will be an oyster supper at the residence of Mr. Lemuel Dowden.

The little daughter of James Carter, of Lincolnia, is dead.

Mr. Burdett Hunter is clerking for T. Terrett & Son.

The youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. A. McCoy is ill.

Mr. Frank Payne is harvesting a large crop of turnips.

Miss Jessie Bell has returned from Lincolnia.

Mr. and Mrs. T. T. Terrett, Jr., gave a party in honor of the third birthday of their son, Vernon.

Mr. and Mrs. Cleveland of the Capital City, spent last week visiting Mr. T. E. Saules.

Mrs. C. H. Powell is ill.

Mr. J. M. Morse has moved to Washington.

The public-school children are practicing for an entertainment to be given on Thanksgiving-Day.

Mr. M. C. Hunter has been quite ill the past week.


PERSONAL

Miss C. Victoria Brown, of Del Roy, Pa., is visiting her aunt, Mrs. Mary A. Payne, and the young men of Barcroft are getting out their sleighs, with the hope of having snow while Miss B. is in the neighborhood.

Mrs. Ed. Klemroth has gone to Brunswick, Ga., where she will remain until about Christmas-time, when Mr. Klem, who is superintending construction of a public building there, will return with her.

Mr. and Mrs. Pritchard have moved into the Shelley place, near Arlington, and will received their friends on and after the 1st of December.

Mrs. Palmer spent several days last week in the city with her sister, Mrs. Ralph Dayton.

Mrs. C. A. Kolb spent a day last week with Mrs. Haring.



PIANOS

AND MERITORIOUS NOVELTIES AND
PATENTED ARTICLES

THE ERCK SPECIALTY CO.

ROOM 54

COAL AND IRON EXCHANGE

BUFFALO -- NEW YORK






The Barcroft News

Published Fortnightly


O. EDW. HARING - - EDITOR

November 23, 1903

TO OUR READERS

With this issue the regular publication of the Barcroft News ceases. The object of its publication has been rather that of pleasure than profit. This editor has accepted a position in the city which requires so much of his time that he can no longer devote that care and attention necessary to the fortnightly production of a paper in keeping with his ideals. However, not wishing to sever entirely our connection with our readers, the paper will continue to appear, but at irregular intervals. We have much enjoyed our six months' experience in the field of journalism; but there is a possibility of getting a surfeit of a good thing. Those subscribers who have paid beyond this issue will be given the option of having the excess returned or of having it placed to their credit in payment for the occasional issue. Every endeavor will be made to make the spasmodic publication as worthy of your patronage as was the regular edition, and we hope to have most patrons remain with us.


Eleven-cent cotton and bright prospects for the isthmian canal have served to wreathe in smiles the faces of our friends of the far South.


NEWSLETTS

Mr. and Mrs. S. P. Wright have moved into their new house. Mr. Wright has given us an object-lesson in making a comfortable home in the country. He has hot and cold water all through the house and other modern conveniences, and has an abundance of spring-water in his barn.

Judge Pelham is complaining of rheumatism, cold, sore throat, gout, toothache, lumbago, headache, phthisis, indigestion, and heart-disease. Wtih all these, however, he retains full control of his temper, and woe to the unwary one who cracks a joke at the Judge's expense.

Mr. T. R. Stoneburner is building the foundation for his new bank-barn, which is to be 40 by 60 feet.

Our near neighbor, Mr. Fred. Bell, had the misfortune to be "touched" for several hundred dollars in the city one day last week. Country people should be more on the alert and look out for the light-fingered gentry of the city.

There's a big persimmon-crop, so look out for a severe winter.


ARLINGTON TIPS

Miss Kate N. Munson spent Saturday and Sunday in Baltimore.

Mrs. C. D. Stoneburner and her daughter will leave for Baltimore to-day on a visit to Mrs. Stoneburner's parents.

Rev. Wm. Pierpont last evening began a series of meetings at the Arlington M. E. Church. A cordial invitation is tendered to all to attend.

Mrs. Sarah Newton, who has been seriously ill for th epast several days, is, we are sorry to say, growing worse.

Mr. Leay's little daughter, of Johnson's Hill, is suffering from a serious attack of lockjaw.

Mr. L. M. Walter has gone into the poultry business. We wish him success.

Chicken-thieves visted Mr. C. D. Stoneburner's hen-house a few nights since, bagging thirty-eight fowls.

Mrs. Margaret O'dowd and son have moved to the city.


Mr. Harry Palmer has bought out the company's interest in the feed-store at Rosslyn and has bought and moved into a palatial residence at Ballston. We rejoice to see the Barcroft boys floating upon the "prosperity" wave.

One of Barcroft's belles is out in a new gray suit to match the hair of her steady company.

Miss Johnston is the proud possessor of eight new collie puppies, which are not for sale, as she is a little short on cats, having only twenty-three at the present time.


PERSONAL

Mr. James Wood, of the Government Printing Office, spent Sunday of last week with Mr. Marye. Mr. Wood is much interested in the subject of unionism, and one of our citizens introduced him to several of the "open shops" of Alexandria county. Mr. Wood's reputation as a "high-five" player received a serious set-back during his visit.

Capt. and Mrs. Frank R. Perkins and their daughter, Miss Rachel, of Buffalo, N.Y., spent last Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. S. P. Wright at the latter's new villa, fronting on Columbia Pike. Mr. and Mrs. Chambers, of the capital City, were also guests of the Wrights. Capt. P. is a veteran of the civil war, and he appears able to command another squadron of cavalry in case we should have a brush with Colombia over the Panama affair.


J. E. DYER & CO.

WHOLESALE

GROCERIES, LIQUORS

3330-32 M ST.

WASHINGTON, D.C.


L. E. PAYNE

Dealer of

GROCERIES, MILL FEED, DRY GOODS

BAILEY'S X-ROADS

VIRGINIA



NEWSLETTS

Carpenters and plasterers are busy at Mr. Marye's residence, corner of Arlington and Fairfax Avenues, providing for his increasing family. Paul will soon need a room all to himself and a night-latch key.

Mr. Fred Corbett is contesting the election of Mr. Will Douglass as supervisor of this district on the grounds that Douglass served as one of the registrars just previous to the recent election.

August Hoffman has sold his deutchhund.

Sparks from the trains are setting fire to the woods.

Col. Slack, of Hunter's Mill, is the proud possessor of two new heifer calves of his famous Beal breed. Col. S. is a model up-to-date farmer, and he entertains in lavish style at "Devil's Woodyard" on Calvin Run. He is an expert with rod and gun, and we understand that he slaughtered hogs enough to have 1000 pounds of pork. We advise our readers to never decline an invitation to the Colonel's hospitable home.


PERSONAL

Mrs. S. A. Marye is visiting her daughter, Mrs. Chamberlain, in the city.

Judge Pelham will leafe for Alabama about December 15 to spend the holidays with his son, John.

Miss Sadie Burkholder spent last Sunday with her sister, Mrs. Frank Hale.


GROCERIES

DRY GOODS

PRODUCE

Best-supplied Country Store on
Columbia Pike. Eighteen years'
experience in this line of trade.

OSCAR HARING

BARCROFT, VIRGINIA


LOTS IN BARCROFT

ARE CONSTANTLY ADVANCING IN PRICE--A SURE
EVIDENCE THAT ITS MANY ADVANTAGES AS
A SUBURBAN RESIDENCE ARE BECOMING
GENERALLY RECOGNIZED.


S. P. WRIGHT, BARCROFT, ALEX. CO., VA.





This page was revised on: August 11, 2008.
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